Feb 282017
 

Dagnabbit! I can’t make things work!

Imagine your buyer client calling you in panic or frustration because the lights in their new home keep going on and off… the garage door is opening by itself… and the thermostat refuses to affect the temperature of the house. Would your first instinct be to suspect the house is haunted? (Bonus point available–that’s called a stigmatized property. Is that a required disclosure in Maine?)

Well, there might just be another explanation and an item for you to add to your closing checklist. (You do have one, right?)  Here’s a link to a recent article in USA Today reporting how “As the Internet of Things finds itself into houses via connected devices, more and more homes contain hot new tech gadgets that can all too easily become unlocked digital backdoors.”

In non-technical language, if the seller forgets to reprogram his smartphone, he could end up opening the garage door of the home he sold.

Speaking of closing checklists,  the article includes a link to a one-page “smarthome checklist” created by the Online Trust Alliance. It’s not exactly free of technical terms but is definitely worth a look. Sorry if it makes your head hurt! Those with kids have access to technical support with this language and these devices.

Seriously, there are some potential issues here to think about–including what electronics “go with the house” and what programming changes need to happen when a property changes hands.

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Let’s Make Learning Fun

 Posted by at 8:07 am
Feb 262017
 

Teachers are, I think, students just by nature of the profession.  But in this case, I became a student both officially and formally by completing an online course offered by STEDI (Substitute Teacher Division, Utah State University) titled “Advanced Classroom Management.”

I wish I could tell you that it was a grueling and stressful experience. Truth be told, I’d actually taken an older version of the course some years ago. So this was a bit of a review and I was able to complete the self-paced course quickly.  Being a typical adult learner, I undervalued the material–at least until I finished.

Then I remembered, sometimes the greatest value of a course is that it reinforces what you already know and increases your confidence. I use many of these techniques while teaching. They are integrated into the Substitute Teacher’s Workshop I offer in conjunction with several adult education programs. So, as the saying goes, “It’s all good.”

Students of all ages often ask, “Do we have to learn this?” I understand the question but also find it a sad one. What happened to the joy of learning?

Seth Godin recently posted some thoughts about the smoker’s lounge at the Helsinki Airport. (There’s still one there.) He observed that most smokers in the lounge didn’t look particularly happy. They had the appearance of doing something because they had to do it.  He also observed many people standing about the lounge checking their phones. They didn’t seem particularly happy either–probably for the same reason. He wondered when we are going to start building social media lounges.

One thing to like about Seth is he makes you think. I’m not sure if his post is about addiction, human nature, social media or something else.

But I do know this: Things that initially bring us pleasure can easily turn into habit and drudgery.  We continue to do them because we have to do them even though the value has diminished. That may include learning.  But when we really start to think about it, the cigarettes, phones, and I would include lessons, do not change. We change–collectively and individually.

But when we really start to think about it, the cigarettes, phones, and I would include lessons, do not change. We change–collectively and individually–how we think about things and our attitude towards them.

Let’s make learning fun.

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Feb 242017
 

One of the challenges we face in real estate courses is making certain our content is current. Come to think of it, that’s a challenge for real estate licensees as well!

There’s an old story claiming that someone once asked Albert Einstein for his phone number and he had to look it up. He supposedly remarked that “an intelligent person doesn’t store information, he knows where to find it.” That makes some sense and carries with it the importance of knowing what we don’t know so we do not give out false information. Einstein had the confidence required to admit he didn’t know the answer to what many would consider a fairly simple question.

So if I asked some number of licensees (particularly those who recently completed the sales agent or associate broker course about the Maine Nonresident Withholding Tax on real estate sales, I suspect many would give an incorrect answer because some rates changed for 2017. When Ben Franklin opined that “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes,” he didn’t mean the amount would be certain–just the existence.

You’d be correct (well, nearly) if you cited the default calculation as 2.5% of the purchase price. “Nearly” is added because the withholding only applies if the sales price is $50,000 or more.

You might also remember there are some alternative calculations and that each requires a waiver from the Maine Department of Revenue. One of those calculations is based on a “small profit.” Those are the rates that have changed for 2017. Those rates are currently 10.1% for residential property and 8.1% for commercial. With a waiver, the seller may be allowed to have the smaller of the two amounts (2.5% of the purchase price, 10.1% of the profit for residential) withheld.

If you think this is starting to get complicated, you get a sticker. Like Einstein, you may be concluding the best answer to the question “How much is the Maine Nonresident Withholding?” is “We’d better look it up.” Actually, an even better answer is “We’d better consult a tax specialist.” (If your client doesn’t have an accountant or tax advisor, like Einstein this might involve a phone book or its Internet equivalent.)

From an estimating point of view, the safe calculation is the default calculation of 2.5% of the sales price. After all, that is the most the seller will have withheld. If your client is a “do-it-yourself” type you can offer him or her the link to the Maine Revenue Services Website. It’s a very user-friendly place with lots of information and all the forms one may need. (Forms and information use the abbreviation REW-Real Estate Withholding.) Note that any request for a reduction in withholding must be made at least five days before closing.

While there’s no minimum on how helpful we should be with our clients, there may be some limitations when it comes to the amount of knowledge we have–particularly in areas such as taxes that extend beyond our area of expertise. Personally, I think a client who is a nonresident of Maine needs to know he or she may be facing at 2.5% withholding from proceeds at closing. We can and should also explain that there are alternative calculations, waivers, and exemptions and these should be discussed with a tax professional well before closing. In the interest of accuracy, perhaps “the less said, the better.”

Another option might be to provide all nonresident sellers with the Notification to Sellers of Withholding Requirement–it could become part of your listing packet and be included on your listing checklist.

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Safety Alert

 Posted by at 5:54 am
Feb 152017
 

The Maine Association of REALTORS® has been made aware by the City of Bath Police Department that a male with an extensive criminal history of theft and fraud (Christopher Heath) has been contacting REALTORS® in the Bath and Hampden areas over the past week. This person has claimed to be a retired firefighter and a potential cash buyer looking for upscale properties. He has a history with law enforcement in Florida, Washington, Virginia, Vermont, and New York and may be accompanied by a female. Please contact the Maine State Police or your local law enforcement if you have had any suspicious interactions with this couple.

A best practice reminder for REALTOR™ safety: Always schedule first meetings with new clients in the office, verify their identity (take a photo of their driver’s license), and introduce them to a colleague.

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Feb 112017
 

Knox-Lincoln Soil & Water Conservation District is sponsoring Maine Forest Service District Forester Morten Moesswilde for a free evening talk, “Stumped About Tree Growth? Understanding Maine’s Tree Growth Tax Law,” at Rockland City Hall on Thursday, Feb 16 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. This program is free and open to the public. No pre-registration is required – just show up!

Moesswilde will provide details about the why’s and how’s of Maine’s Tree Growth Property Tax program, which provides eligible woodland owners with reduced property tax valuations if they commit to managing the land long-term for forest products.

The Tree Growth program has broad participation from small to medium-sized woodland owners across midcoast Maine and beyond, yet sometimes generates misconceptions and misinformation about what it actually involves. With an annual deadline of April 1 for new enrollees and some re-certifying parcels, landowners who are considering enrolling, or who are already enrolled and need to find out more, should find this program helpful in understanding their options and responsibilities under Tree Growth.

Moesswilde will present the basic provisions and requirements of Tree Growth, and allow time for questions and discussion of specific situations. In addition, he will discuss further resources available for landowners including free “walk and talks” on their land with a Maine Forest Service (MFS) District Forester; assistance with woodland planning; and publications on a variety of topics – as well as additional upcoming workshops. The Maine Forest Service is part of the maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation & Forestry, and provides numerous resources, assistance, and presentations about trees and forests in Maine, including owning, enjoying, planning for, and, where desired, harvesting forest products on woodlands.

For more information, contact Knox-Lincoln SWCD at 596-2040, hildy@knox-lincoln.org or MFS District Forester Morten Moesswilde at 441-2895, morten.moesswilde@maine.gov

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